Qu’ranic and Mormonic Apologetics

This episode of Point of Inquiry was so interesting to me on so many levels. Professor Schimmel speaks on Specious Proofs for Quranic Divinity (basically Qu’ranic apologetic methods). Throughout the interview the word Qu’ran seemed to easily be interchanged with the Book of Mormon. Many of Islam’s apologetics with regards to the Qu’ran appear to mirror some of those of the LDS’. An example in the podcast is where the point was made that many defenders of the Qu’ran claim that the ancient text held scientific truths (about the history of the universe) well before man discovered these truths. I have heard many such claims about the Book of Mormon as well.

The whole podcast, like I said earlier, could easily be a podcast on Mormonism, it’s apologetics and it’s holy scriptures. It’s amazing to see how similar we are to other religions in many regards. If you check out this episode, let me know what you think by commenting below.

[Download Mp3] [Description from POI]:

Solomon Schimmel

Solomon Schimmel is a psychologist of religion and Professor of Jewish Education and Psychology at Hebrew College. He has been a Fulbright Senior Research Scholar and Visiting Fellow at Cambridge University and has lectured widely throughout the world. An expert on the psychology of forgiveness and reconciliation among the world’s religions, he is the author of The Seven Deadly Sins: Jewish, Christian, and Classical Reflections on Human Psychology and Wounds Not Healed by Time: The Power of Repentance and Forgiveness, both published by Oxford University Press. His forthcoming book, also to be published by Oxford University Press, is tentatively titled The Tenacity of Unreasonable Beliefs: Jewish Christian and Muslim Scriptural Fundamentalists.

In this discussion with D.J. Grothe, Professor Schimmel discusses the psychology of religion, why some believers use specious arguments for the divine authorship of their sacred texts, and the threat to civilization that certain Muslim extremists pose. He also talks about the obligation he says scholars have to undermine such anti-social and anti-democratic belief-systems.

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~ by bonoboi on March 5, 2007.

8 Responses to “Qu’ranic and Mormonic Apologetics”

  1. I think the apologetics for Joseph Smith and Mohammed are also very similar in many ways. You should check them out. If I can find them again, I’ll post them.

  2. Cool- well let me know when you find it again!

  3. I remember reading how Muslims justify Mohammed taking an underaged bride and it was exactly the same arguments made by LDS for Joseph Smith (you can’t prove he had sex with her, it was okay at that time, God told him to, etc.)

    Here is some comparisons from http://www.mormonapologetics.org/index.php?showtopic=8088&st=0

    Islam sprang out of a fervent and fractious time of religious ferment among Christian and pagan sects just outside the eastern frontier of Europe.

    Mormonism sprang out of a fervent and fractious time of religious ferment among Christian sects on the American frontier (you could say just outside the western frontier of Europe).

    Islam’s founder, Muhammad, went to a cave to pray and ask God which of the many diverse and fractious Christian faiths in his time and place was true.

    Mormonism’s founder, Joseph, went to a grove to pray and ask God which of the many diverse and fractious Christian faiths in his time and place was true.

    Muhammad received a “First Vision,” a heavenly visitation from God himself (Allah) in which God told him all the sects were false and an abomination in the eyes of God, and Muhammad was the prophet chosen of God to usher in the last dispensation.

    Joseph received a “First Vision,” a heavenly visitation from “God the Father” and Jesus themselves, in which God told him all the sects were false and an abomination in the eyes of God, and Joseph was the prophet chosen of God to usher in the last dispensation.

    Muhammad generated Islam’s own unique canon of scripture, which built on the Jews’ ancient canon, even recognizing Abraham, Moses, Jesus et al., as great men in their own right, though traditional Judeo-Christian theology represented a corruption of God’s original pristine religion.

    Joseph generated Mormonism’s own unique canon of scripture, which built on the Jews’ ancient canon, even recognizing the Abraham, Moses, et al., as great men in their own right, though traditional Judeo-Christian theology represented a corruption of God’s original pristine Church. (Harold Bloom calls the D&C the closest thing out there to the Koran in style, format and tone, although the D&C is more prosaic, he says.)

    While, unlike Islam, Mormonism does not reject Jesus as the Son of God and expiator of our sins, it diverges materially from other sects who regard themselves as Christian as regarding Jesus as separate from (and therefore by necessary implication subordinate to) God the Father as did Arianism. Mormonism’s concept of the Godhead is regarded by virtually all if not all other established Christian sects as the ultimate heresy.

    Both religions regard their founding “Prophet” as at the right hand of God, and next to God (and in the Mormons’ case Jesus too), the greatest of all beings.

    Both religions regard their respective creeds to be “revelation” received by the “Prophet”; therefore, those outside the faith are strictly infidels who cannot be saved. This aspect of both religions’ creed is absolute and unyielding. For example, there is no acknowledged long term evolutionary process by which the religion came into being through writings and inspiration on the part of the “Fathers of the Church” or other inspired leaders such as Luther and other men who built on their works such as Augustine or Calvin.

    Both religions took root and became institutionalized amid nomads, during a period of wandering in the wilderness.

    Both religions sharply segregate the sexes during their most sacred ceremonies.

    Both religions are reputed to relegate women to a subordinate status to men, throughout their respective cultures.

    Both religions eschew, and are repelled by, European intellectual traditions, materialism, androgenous culture, and Classical (i.e., Roman) foundations, to which they acknowledge no debt.

    The scriptural canons that are unique to Islam and Mormonism both explicitly acknowledge maybe celebrate the place of warfare and even violence in God’s plan.

    Polygamy.

    Both religions regard tobacco, caffeine and alcohol as a forbidden defilement of the flesh in any increment (serving to further set their adherents apart from European based culture).

    Both religions require special garments (serving to further set their adherents apart from European based culture).

  4. Those are definitely some striking resemblances although some are a little exaggerated. Nonetheless, it has been interesting to see these similarities- thanks for pointing them out!

  5. “Both religions regard their respective creeds to be “revelation” received by the “Prophet”; therefore, those outside the faith are strictly infidels who cannot be saved.”

    I don’t think that this is an accurate observation about Mormonism. LDS doctrine makes plenty of room for the salvation of “infidels”– a person my compare the absolutism in both religion’s claim to correct doctrine and the consequent implications that their method of salvation is the only valid one, but “cannot be saved” is not part of Mormon theology in any way.

  6. Well, except for sons of perdition.

  7. I wonder if God is such a perfect being, why oh why did He half to redo things, and when Christ said, “it is finished”, i’m guessing that He must have been just been joking…

  8. Why do we assume that “democracy” is an excellent form of government? Why. A simple question, and it is a question.

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